Connect with us
//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});

Feature

TAKE OUR POLL: After Robert Mugabe’s Resignation, Which Of These 5 African Dictators Is Most Likely To Step Down Next?

Published

on

In a very recent and suprising turn of of events, President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe resigned, becoming the 3rd African President to step down from power this year after over 2 decades of rule. Prior to his resignation, Angola’s President José Eduardo dos Santos stepped down after 38 years of rule. In The Gambia, President Yahyah Jammeh was forced out after losing elections – this effectively ended his 23 year rule.

TAKE OUR POLL

Which Of These 5 African Dictators Is Most Likely To Resign In 2018?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Africa’s Presidents With Over 15 Years In Power

CountryPresidentTermYears In PowerAge
AlgeriaAbdelaziz Bouteflika1999-Present1880
AngolaJosé Eduardo dos Santos1979-20173875
CameroonPaul Biya1982-Present3582
ChadIdriss Déby1990-Present2765
Republic of the CongoDenis Sassou Nguesso1997–Present2073
Democratic Republic of the CongoJoseph Kabila2001–Present1646
DjiboutiIsmaïl Omar Guelleh1999–Present1870
Equatorial GuineaTeodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo1979–Present3875
EritreaIsaias Afwerki1991–Present2671
The GambiaYahya Jammeh1994–20172352
RwandaPaul Kagame2000-Present1760
UgandaYoweri Museveni1986-Present3173
ZimbabweRobert Mugabe1987–20173093

Facebook Comments

Advertisement //pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Feature

Here Is The Speech From The 2018 National Security Symposium In Rwanda That Has Everyone Talking

Published

on


Kenyan Professor P.L.O Lumumba is known for his thought provoking speeches so it comes as no surprise that he did not hold back his assessment of Africa’s predicament.

The three-day National Security Symposium opened at the Rwanda Defense Force Command and Staff College in Musanze District with contemporary security challenges in Africa on the agenda.

The symposium brings together 45 students from 10 countries namely: Czech Republic, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Senegal, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and Zambia.

All participants hold ranks from Major to Lieutenant Colonel. Organised in collaboration with University of Rwanda, the symposium features academics, national security experts, researchers among others, and it is part of a one-year senior officers’ course offered at the college.

THESE MIGHT INTEREST YOU


Facebook Comments

Continue Reading

Feature

Tanzania’s “Moral Decadence” Cyber Regulations Includes This Shocking Requirement

Published

on


Tanzania’s government has approved new internet regulations, giving itself unprecedented control over the internet. The government contends that the new Electronic and Postal Communications (Online Content) Regulations 2018 will help to put a stop to the “moral decadence” caused by social media and internet in the country. Social media has also been described as a threat to national security by some policy makers in Tanzania.

TAKE OUR POLL

Is Tanzania's New Cyber Law A Step In The Right Direction?

Loading ... Loading ...

Below are some of the regulations

Blogging License Fees: With an application fee of 100,000 Tanzanian Shillings, an initial license fee of 1,000,000 Tanzanian Shillings and an annual license fee of 1,000,000 Tanzanian Shillings, Tanzanians have to pay up to $900 to operate a personal blog in the country.  The $930 blogging fee will likely be a barrier for many people in a country where, according to the World Bank in 2016, GDP per capita was just $878 a year. “Where are bloggers and online platforms going to get the money to pay such high charges?” asked Neville Meena of the Tanzania Editors Forum, who regards the law as a government attempt to “restrict access to information in Tanzania.”

Internet Content Regulations: The Tanzanian government has the right to revoke a permit if a site publishes content that is considered to be ‘indecent, obscene, hate speech, extreme violence or material that will offend or incite others, cause annoyance, threaten, or encourage or incite crime, or lead to public disorder’. Online content providers will also be required to remove ‘prohibited content’ within 12 hours or face fines not less than five million shillings ($2,210) or a year in prison. online platforms are required to bar anyone from posting anonymously or without being registered. “This is going to kill bloggers in Tanzania,” said Mike Mushi, one of the cofounders of the Jamii Forums news platform. “Most will lose advertisers since they are not legally registered,” he told RSF.

Mandatory Mobile Security: Tanzanians with mobile devices are required to secure it with a password or be fined. The fines can go up to 5 million Tanzanian shillings (aboug $2000)

Internet Cafés Surveillance: Internet cafés are required to have surveillance to record and archive activities inside their business premises.

Maxence Melo

Digital activist Maxence Melo is the founder of Jamii Forums, a Swahili-language whisteblowing and blogging site. He was charged in 2016 under a cybrercrimes law. The hashtag #FreeMaxenceMelo was launched after he was arrested.

“These regulations were supposed to uphold citizens’ rights to privacy, access to information and free expression,” Maxence Melo, the director of the Jamii Forums, the “Swahili Wikileaks,” told CNN. “We have completely lost our Freedom on the Cyberspace.”

Read More Here >>

Facebook Comments

Continue Reading

Feature

TAKE OUR POLL: Should This Employee Be Fired?

Published

on

We are often disgusted by Africans who do not respect their position or who take us for granted in their call of duty. So when South Africa’s Minister of Home-Affairs saw the following video making the rounds on Twitter of an employee in his area of responsibility this morning, he reacted with the following statement.

I was this morning informed about the video circulating on social media platforms, and have asked the Department of @HomeAffairsSA to investigate this matter and take swift action against the official. pic.twitter.com/ZwllSemEyZ

— Malusi Gigaba (@mgigaba) March 14, 2018

Twitter Reaction

However, the Minister’s reaction was met with mixed responses. Some thought the lady should be fired, others thought otherwise. If you were in the Minister’s position, what will you do? Take our poll below and share your thoughts.

Fair enough but the president must also take action against you for playing candy crush on duty the official is motivated by you pic.twitter.com/wJrulfYDI5

thapelo moretsele (@TMoretsele) March 14, 2018

Mr Gigaba that lady must be fired,not even checking on the system whether passport is valid or not.. this are the people who make us your officials look bad

— lucky kunene (@KuneneLucky21) March 14, 2018

Now you know the things we have to deal with. Mind you the queue could be as long as the Nile river.

— Sam.Woko (@Samwoko) March 14, 2018

Don’t fire this lady, reprimand her for using her phone or impose any sanction equal to departmental policy on such acts. Don’t let social media run government.

— Phumlani Mzobe (@ButiPhumlani) March 14, 2018

TAKE OUR POLL

Should This South Africa Home Affairs Employee Be Fired For Prioritizing Facebook Over Her Job?

Loading ... Loading ...

Facebook Comments

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Popular Posts